An Irish Civil Engineering professional's perspective from Brazil

Brazil held its first wind-only energy auction in 2009, in a move to diversify its energy portfolio… and foreign companies scrambled to take part.

Some background

Soon after the millennium, a drought in Brazil that cut water to the country’s hydroelectric dams prompted severe energy shortages.

The crisis, which ravaged the country’s economy and led to electricity rationing, underscored Brazil’s pressing need to diversify away from water power.

The bidding is expected to lead to the construction of two gigawatts of wind production with an investment of about US$ 6 billion over the next two years.

Brazil counts on hydroelectricity for more than 3/4 of its electricity, but authorities are pushing biomass and wind as primary alternatives.

Wind energy’s greatest potential in Brazil is during the dry season, so it is considered as a good bet against low rainfall and the geographical spread of existing hydro resources.

Brazil’s technical potential for wind energy is 143 gigawatts due to the country’s blustery 4,600-mile coastline, where most projects are based.

The Brazilian Wind Energy Association and the government have set a goal of achieving 10 gigawatts of wind energy capacity by 2020 from the current 605 megawatts, with another 450 megawatts under construction.

The industry hopes the auction will help kick-start the wind-energy sector, which already accounts for 70% of the total in all of Latin America.


Plenty of Windfarms, mainly in the North East of the country... however many more are planned in the rest of Brazil.


Wind power in Brazil amounts to an installed capacity of 602 MW at the end of 2009, enough to power a city about 300,000 residences.

The 36 windparks and windfarms in the country, in 2009, were located in Northeastern Brazil (5 States), Southern Brazil (3 States), and Southeastern Brazil (1 State).

Potential of wind in Brazil is more intense from June to December, coinciding with the months of lower rainfall intensity.

This puts wind as a potential supplementary source of energy generated by hydroelectricity.

As of 2009, 10 projects were under construction, with a capacity of 256 MW. In 2010, 45 started construction to generate 2,139 MW, in several States around Brazil.

The U.S. company General Electric has one plant in Brazil, in the city of Campinas, and one partnership with Tecsis in Sorocaba, meeting the demand of the new projects.

While the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) was taking place in Copenhagen, Brazil’s National Electric Energy Agency (ANEEL) held the country’s first ever wind-only energy auction.

On December 14 2009, around 1,800 megawatts (MW) were contracted with energy from 71 wind power plants scheduled to be delivered beginning from July 1, 2012.

While focusing domestically on wind-energy generation, Brazil is part of a larger international movement toward wind power as a primary source of energy.

In fact, wind power has seen the highest expansion rate of all available renewable energy sources, with an average growth of 27% per year since 1990, according to the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC).

Government support for renewable energy

Brazil’s first wind-energy turbine was installed in Fernando de Noronha Archipelago in 1992.

Ten years later the government created the Program for Incentive of Alternative Electric Energy Sources (PROINFA) to encourage the use of other renewable sources, such as wind power, biomass, and Small Hydroelectric Power Stations (PCHs).

Such stations use hydropower, the flagship of Brazil’s energy matrix, which comprises around three-quarters of Brazil’s installed energy capacity.

High energy production costs, coupled with the advantages of wind power as a renewable, widely available energy source, have led several countries to establish regulatory incentives and direct financial investments to stimulate wind power generation.

Growth of wind energy in Brazil

Since the inception of PROINFA, Brazil’s wind energy production has escalated from 22 MW in 2003 to 602 MW in 2009, as part of 36 private projects. Another 10 projects are under construction, with a capacity of 256.4 MW, and 45 additional projects have been approved be ANEEL with an estimated potential of 2,139.7 MW.  Developing these wind power sources in Brazil is helping the country to meet its strategic objectives of enhancing energy security, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating jobs. The potential for this type of power generation in Brazil could reach up to 145,000 MW, according to the 2001 Brazilian Wind Power Potential Report by the Electric Energy Research Center (CEPEL).

Average Annual Wind Velocity - Brazil.

As you can see comparing these wind velocities and the previous map of current and planned projects… there are many areas of high potential (yellows and reds) which do not yet have windfarms installed or even planned past a concept stage.

Cost

The cost of energy production continues to pose a significant challenge to the growth of wind energy. The price per megawatt hour (MWh) established in Brazil’s auction of wind power reserve supply is R$189, while the cap defined in bidding for power plants of the Madeira River Hydroelectricity Complex was R$91 (UHE Jirau) in 2008, and R$122 (UHE Santo Antonio) in 2007. These hydroelectricity prices were marked down by up to 35% in the 2008 and 2007 auctions; the energy supply was negotiated at R$71.4/MWh in the case of Jirau, and R$78.9/MWh for the Santo Antonio plant.


Canoa Quebrada Windturbines

A passing bus near Canoa Quebrada, Brazil, demonstrates the size of modern wind turbines.

To conclude… there is no conclusion.

Wind in Brazil is an ongoing subject, and I believe that Wind should be developed in as a priority source of energy. Even more so than Brazil’s hydro-electric system, and as is currently being debated in Congress in Brazil how it may have negative consequences on indigenous reserves by means of extensive flooding. This I will discuss at length in another article.

Let’s see if Brazil will not forget about Wind Energy now that Petrobras has made such lucrative finds of Oil and Gas offshore of Rio.

I am hopeful.

However if we wish to play a part in Brazil’s future… then we need to be in it, to win it!

New power plant, to be in place and operational before 2014

Nicknamed “The Marvelous City,” Rio de Janeiro is the gateway to Brazil. And soon over 7-million spectators will arrive for the highly anticipated 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. The world will watch as Rio becomes the first city to host the Olympic games in South America and only the second to ever host both events back to back. There is however growing concern that the Olympic torch will be the only thing illuminating the night sky. That’s because Rio has repeatedly fallen victim to some of the worst power failures in history. So the Brazilian government has launched an ambitious plan to remove the entire city from the nation’s aging power grid and transform Rio into a self-sufficient ‘power island.’ The plan includes re-linking over 160 km of power lines, building the largest nuclear generator in the country, and the lynchpin: the Simplício Hydroelectric Complex.

This is one the of largest construction sites in the world, spanning an incredible 24 km. Crews are racing to divert over 780-billion gallons of water from the Paraiba do Sul River through some of the world’s widest tunnels. Once operational, this hydroelectric facility will help to generate nearly 30% more power for Rio. But with January storms threatening to dump over a foot of rain on their progress, crews must prepare for the messy and dangerous road ahead.

The project is a joint venture between Odebrecht Energy (leader) and Andrade Gutierrez. The project, contracted by Eletrobras (Furnas Centrais Elétricas S.A.), encompasses the towns of Três Rios and Sapucaia (Rio de Janeiro), Além Paraíba and Chiador (Minas Gerais) and includes a concrete dam in Anta, and two energy houses separated by a hydraulic circuit formed by channels, dikes and tunnels. When finished the Complex will have a production capacity of 333.7 MW.

The decision to re-route the river (as opposed to creating a reservoir, by flooding upstream) was in the interest of minimizing the project’s social and environmental impact on the region.

According to Fernando Chein, Contract Director, the construction of the Anta dam with Rolled Compacted Concrete is a major advantage:

“The system presents advantages such as speed in finishing the project and in the reduction, by half, in the use of cement by cubic meter of concrete”.

Seven of the Widest Tunnels in the World
Countless waterfalls and rapids make the Paraiba do Sul one of the wildest rivers in Brazil. To accommodate its torrent, each of the 7 diversion tunnels on the Simplício Hydroelectric Project must measure over 50 m in circumference. But there isn’t a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) on the planet that large. So workers must rely on a far more dangerous method of tunneling — heavy-duty jumbo drills and dynamite.

 

Tunnel no.3 (6km long)

One of the Biggest Construction Sites in the World
The Simplício Hydroelectric Complex spans over 24 km, making it one of the biggest construction sites on Earth. Not only is this project larger than Manhattan Island, it’s also equipped with a city-like infrastructure complete with 5 medical centers, 4 data/voice towers, 6 cafeterias, 3 concrete plants, and a fleet of 70 cars and buses.

Everything in this project is on a grand scale

One of the Largest Earth-Moving Projects in the World
If a dam is constructed directly on the Paraiba do Sul River the reservoir it creates will flood the nearby town of Sapucaia. Rather than displace 130,000 people, engineers are diverting the river for a stretch of 24 km through 7 different mountains and 13 man-made channels. To pull off a job of this size workers must use over 600 different earth-moving vehicles. The contractors are utilising a an innovative construction method for the Civil works called hydroseeding, in order to stabilise the slopes.

Some of the Civil Engineering works in the Simplício complex

Longest Power Transmission Link Ever Built
Approximately 90% of Brazil’s power comes from hydroelectricity. And because most of the country’s water is located in the Amazon rainforest, an extensive power grid is needed to connect remote hydroelectric outposts with major coastal cities like Rio de Janeiro. The latest addition to this grid will extend an unprecedented 2,400 km, making it the longest power transmission link in the world.

3 Giant Turbines
The Francis turbine is the most widely used hydro turbine on the planet. Here at Simplício, 3 of them will be in use, each capable of generating 102 megawatts of power. But the real benefit to the Francis turbine is adaptability. The erratic flow of the Paraiba do Sul creates a major obstacle for this project because drastic changes in water pressure at a hydroelectric plant either hamper energy production or completely destroy the turbines. The Francis turbine however has a revolutionary design that accommodates heads ranging anywhere from 9 m to upwards of 30 m.

Most Powerful Hydroelectric Plant in the World
The Itaipu Dam is Brazil’s greatest source of energy and home to one of the biggest hydroelectric complexes in the world. It is located in the south of Brazil, near the Foz do Iguaçu waterfalls on the border with Argentina and Paraguay. In 2008 the plant generated a record 94.68-billion kilowatt-hours. That’s over 10-billion kilowatt-hours more than Three Gorges Dam! Here, maintenance is paramount since Itaipu supplies 20% of the energy consumed by Brazil and 90% of that consumed by Paraguay.

Itaipu dam (low flow)

Some recent developments in relation to the improvements currently taking place in the health system and its infrastructure in Brazil.

The World Family Organisation is planning to build a few hospitals in Brazil over the next five years.

The WFO is currently constructing a much-needed regional hospital in the city of Biguaçu in state of Santa Catarina.

Dr. Deisi Kusztra (President of the World Family Organization) acompanying Raimundo Columbo (governor of Santa Catarina) during an inspection of construction work at Biguaçu Regional Hospital on February 4, 2011.

For more on this project, plese visit the WFO News Archives at the following link: Training in Biguaçu Municipality – SC

The same NGO has already built one hospital (in 2008) in the larger city of Balneário Camboriú in Santa Catarina.

Whilst Brazil can proudly boast one of the best public health systems in the world, it is only true on paper.

Coping with a population of nearly 200 million makes SUS (Universal Health System) painstakingly beaurocratic and at times completely ineffective.

However with continued investment, as the current Government is hoping and working towards, there will be a substantial improvement in the efficiency and standards which have hampered Brazil’s social progress (and consequently economic progress also).

Introducing the topic

Many of my readers have expressed an interest in this topic. So in this article I will give you an overview of what you must do.

Firstly if you wish to work in Brazil, you must of course have some form of a valid Work Visa.

Then you should look into the exact responsibilities you will have, (based on where you will work) such as;

  • Will you have to sign documentation, as a Professional or Chartered Engineer?
  • What language will you work in primarily? Portuguese or English?

If you are going to work in a company, where other Engineers already have a CREA number, then you should confirm whether or not you really need to become a registered Engineer in Brazil. Since in many cases there will be a system in place in such companies, whereby another Engineer will take the role of supervising, reviewing and signing any such documentation.

Also, if you are going to sign documentation, you will be required to understand such documentation in Portuguese. There are solutions to this, as many foreigners do already work here in Brazil, and the language is not difficult to learn, if you are motivated.

I advise that anyone planning to move to Brazil should be prepared to embrace the Portuguese language. It is important to be able to communicate openly and without any misunderstanding, if your colleague does not speak English. At the same time, many professionals in Brazil do speak very good English. Do not enter into this process, without properly researching and confirming your own details against the requirements beforehand, as it is a substantial undertaking.

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Some background information

If you wish to a work as a registered Engineer in the Federal Republic of Brazil, you apply for this through the regulatory authority called CREA. I will outline the steps required to apply for this.

My information and research is based on actual CREA Federal guidelines in Brazil. 1

CREA is an acronym for Conselho Regional de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Agronomia.  Which means the Regional Council of Engineering, Architecture and Agronomy.

CONFEA is the national authority which oversees all of the regional CREA authorities.

CONFEA is an acronym for Conselho Federal de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Agronomia. Which translates to the Federal Council of Engineering, Architecture and Agronomy.

There is a CREA for each Federal State in Brazil. For example in São Paulo there is CREA-SP, and in Rio de Janeiro there is CREA-RJ. As there are 27 states in Brazil (26 Federal States and 1 Federal District) and since each of these has its own CREA, I will only concentrate on the details of Santa Catarina state as an example. A list of the various CREA authorities, throughout Brazil, can be found here. (via brasilengenharia.com.br)

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Detailed guidelines

1.01 – PROFESSIONAL RECORD

► DESCRIPTION ►

It’s the way professional graduates in the country or from abroad, working in the fields of Engineering, Architecture, Agronomy, Geology, Geography and Meteorology, request their registration in CREA-SC. This procedure is obligatory for the professional who wishes to pursue its activities in the state of Santa Catarina.

►LEGISLATION ►

Law No. 5.194/66 and Resolutions No. 1007/03, 494/06, 504/07 and 1016/06 of CONFEA.

► WHERE TO REGISTER ►

Care Units in CREA-SC or forwarding the documents through the postal service.

► DOCUMENTS REQUIRED ►

Click here to check the necessary documents, which are also available in the Service Units of CREA-SC.

In the case of an Engineer wishing to apply for a temporary CREA registration, the following will be needed.

The documentation must be completed correctly with no mistakes and presented in an original or certified copy to copy. The translation is required for foreign language documents, authenticated by the Brazilian consular authority, must be performed by a sworn translator. Except those issued by Portuguese-speaking countries.

1 - Application for Individual duly completed and signed, as MODEL . When the application is signed by an attorney if the attorney is particular must have notarized.  If it is public (issued by Clerk) no need of notarization.

2 - Diploma or certificate.

3 - School records showing the hours, duly signed, verified that the student is formed. Logs sent via the Internet will only be accepted with the signature of the Institution of Education concerned.

4 - Syllabus of courses taken.

5 - A document indicating the duration of the course taught by the academic institution.

6 - Identification Card (when the applicant is Brazilian).
Can be replaced by another identity document regulated by federal law that has validity throughout the national territory, except for the professional portfolio of CREA. It is noteworthy that the number and issuing agency to be registered on the books of CREA this document will be submitted as an identity.

7 - Ballot identity when foreign visa holder permanent or temporary
The professional foreign visa holder permanent or temporary, must submit an identity card issued under the law, consisting number, issue date and issuing office.
The identity card of a foreigner, being processed, may be replaced by a copy of the authorized act of stay in the country, published in the Official Gazette, together with the Protocol Department of the Federal Police.

8 - Registration for Individuals in Brazil (CPF card), with name and number clearly legible.

9 - Voter Registration (when the applicant is Brazilian).
Can be replaced by the certificate of discharge issued by the electoral Regional Electoral Court (can be found at www.tse.gov.br ).

10 - Proof of discharge from Elections, (when the applicant is Brazilian).
Proof of reasons that the applicant could not participate in election voting, in which case present the certificate of discharge election, issued by the competent organ. The certificate of discharge may be withdrawn at the Electoral Court’s site www.tse.gov.br .

11 – Proof of Military Service discharge (when the applicant is Brazilian).
In accordance with Article 210 of RLSM (Regulation of the Law on Military Service), every citizen who has completed 46 (forty-six years) is under no obligation to submit proof of enlistment.

12 - Translation of qualification (Degree/Diploma), except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

13 - Translation of history, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

14 - Translation of the syllabus, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

15 - Translation of the document indicating the duration of the term, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

16 - A document showing the working relationship between the procuring entity and professional.
A. Employment contract with an entity of public or private;
B. Contract of service without employment, endorsed or registered with the competent body, or
C. Evidence of temporary bond with the Brazilian Government for the provision of service.

17 - Statement by the procuring entity, specifying the activities that will develop in the Brazil.

18 - Statement by the procuring entity, indicating a Brazilian assistant will be retained as an assistant to the foreign professional.

19 - Proof of relationship between the contractor and the Brazilian assistant.

20 - Order of the Ministry of Labor (Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego) authorizing work in Brazil.

21 - Two recent photos, front, 3x4cm in size, in colour and with a white background.

22 - Laboratory examination indicating the blood type and RH factor (OPTIONAL): confirmation by specific laboratory tests, portfolio donor or similar proof.

23 - Proof of residence, preferably on behalf of professional (can be acceptable proof of residence in the name of the Father or Mother). In the case of it being in the name of another person, then the declaration stating that the professional lives in owner’s property (this statement need not be submitted in a notarized form).

24 - Proof of fee duly paid (single copy).
To send the tab for the site, return to the home page, enter the CPF / CNPJ  link “BILLET FEE / SERVICE” located on the right side of the page under “Online Services – Issuance of a bill,” and selecting the code rate 101 – 0 – “Registration of Professional Portfolio” and 109-1 “Expedition Professional License / Relisting.

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An Engineer applying for a permanent CREA registration will be required to furnish the following.

The documentation must be completed correctly with no mistakes and presented in an original or certified copy to copy.
The translation is required for foreign language documents, authenticated by the Brazilian consular authority, must be performed by a sworn translator. Except those issued by Portuguese-speaking countries.

1 -Application for Individual duly completed and signed, as MODEL .
When the application is signed by an attorney if the attorney is particular must have notarized.  If it is public (issued by Clerk) no need of notarization.

2 - Diploma or certificate.

3 - School records showing the hours, duly signed, verified that the student is formed. Logs sent via the Internet will only be accepted with the signature of the Institution of Education concerned.

4 - Syllabus of courses taken.

5 - A document indicating the duration of the course taught by the academic institution.

6 - Identification Card (when the applicant is Brazilian).
Can be replaced by another identity document regulated by federal law that has validity throughout the national territory, except for the professional portfolio of CREA. It is noteworthy that the number and issuing agency to be registered on the books of CREA this document will be submitted as an identity.

7 - Ballot identity when foreign permanent visa holder.
The foreign professional permanent visa holder (for final registration), must submit an identity card issued under the law, consisting number, issue date and issuing office.
The identity card of a foreigner, being processed, may be replaced by a copy of the authorized act of stay in the country, published in the Official Gazette, together with the Protocol Department of the Federal Police.

8 - Registration for Individuals in Brazil (CPF card), with name and number clearly legible.9 - Voter Registration (when the applicant is Brazilian). Can be replaced by the certificate of discharge issued by the electoral Regional Electoral Court (can be found at www.tse.gov.br ).

10 - Proof of discharge from Elections, (when the applicant is Brazilian).
Proof of reasons that the applicant could not participate in election voting, in which case present the certificate of discharge election, issued by the competent organ. The certificate of discharge may be withdrawn at the Electoral Court’s site www.tse.gov.br .

11 – Proof of Military Service discharge (when the applicant is Brazilian).
In accordance with Article 210 of RLSM (Regulation of the Law on Military Service), every citizen who has completed 46 (forty-six years) is under no obligation to submit proof of enlistment.

12 - Translation of qualification (Degree/Diploma), except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

13 - Translation of history, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

14 - Translation of the syllabus, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

15 - Translation of the document indicating the duration of the term, except for documents from Portuguese-speaking countries.

16 - A document showing the working relationship between the procuring entity and professional.
A. Employment contract with an entity of public or private;
B. Contract of service without employment, endorsed or registered with the competent body, or
C. Evidence of temporary bond with the Brazilian Government for the provision of service.

17 - Statement by the procuring entity, specifying the activities that will develop in the Brazil.

18 - Statement by the procuring entity, indicating a Brazilian assistant will be retained as an assistant to the foreign professional.

19 - Proof of relationship between the contractor and the Brazilian assistant.

20 - Order of the Ministry of Labor (Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego) authorizing work in Brazil.

21 - Two recent photos, front, 3x4cm in size, in colour and with a white background.

22 - Laboratory examination indicating the blood type and RH factor (OPTIONAL): confirmation by specific laboratory tests, portfolio donor or similar proof.

23 - Proof of residence, preferably on behalf of professional (can be acceptable proof of residence in the name of the Father or Mother). In the case of it being in the name of another person, then the declaration stating that the professional lives in owner’s property (this statement need not be submitted in a notarized form).

24 - Proof of fee duly paid (single copy).
To send the tab for the site, return to the home page, enter the CPF / CNPJ  link “BILLET FEE / SERVICE” located on the right side of the page under “Online Services – Issuance of a bill,” and selecting the code rate 101 – 0 – “Registration of Professional Portfolio” and 109-1 “Expedition Professional License / Relisting.

► RATES ►

Consult the table of service fees also available at any office of CREA-SC.

• To send the tab for the site, return to the home page, enter the CPF / CNPJ the link “BILLET FEE / SERVICE” located on the right side of the page under “Online Services – Issuance of a bill,” and selecting the code rate 101 – 0 – “Registration of Professional Portfolio” and 109-1 “Expedition Professional License / Relisting”.

► DEADLINE ►

• Professional Registration graduated in Brazil: on average 05 (five) working days for professionals trained in Santa Catarina, whose course has been duly approved by CREA-SC. On average 30 (thirty) days for professionals trained in other states or records formed in Santa Catarina whose courses are not approved.

• Professional Registration qualified overseas, applicant for registration of temporary or permanent, indefinite term.

If in doubt refer to the Frequently Asked Questions on the CREA-SC website, or contact their Customer Service Center by calling 0055 48 3331 2000.

~


Useful contact information

CONFEA

Address: Av. W/3 – SEPN 508 – Bloco A. CEP: 70.740-541 – Brasília – DF – Brazil.

Telephone: 0055 61 2105 3700

Web: www.confea.org.br

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CREA-SP (São Paulo state)

Address: Av. Dr. Dante Pazzanese, 120 – Vila Mariana – CEP: 04012-180 – São Paulo – SP – Brazil.

Telephone: 0055 11 3466 9200

E-Mail: Web: www.creasp.org.br

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CREA-RJ (Rio de Janeiro state)

Address: Rua Buenos Aires, 40 – Centro – RJ – CEP: 20070-022 –Brazil

Telephone: 0055 21 2179 2007   &  0055 21 2179 2000

Web www.crea-rj.org.br

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CREA-SC (Santa Catarina state)

Address: Rodovia Admar Gonzaga, 2125 – Itacorubi – Caixa Postal: 125 – CEP: 88034-001 – Florianópolis – SC – Brazil

Telephone: 0055 48 3331 2000    Fax: 0055 48 3331 2009     (Office hours, Monday to Friday, from 8am to 6pm)

E-Mail: crea-sc@crea-sc.org.br    Web: www.crea-sc.org.br

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Revista Engenharia (Magazine of the Institution of Engineering in Brazil)

Address: Rua Alice de Castro, 47 – Vl. Mariana – CEP 04015.040 – São Paulo – SP – Brazil.

Telephone: 0055 (11) 5575 8155    Fax: 0055 (11) 5575 8804    (Office hours, Monday to Friday, from 9am to 6pm)

E-mail: info@brasilengenharia.com.br    Web: www.brasilengenharia.com.br

Some news which may be of interest to those of my readership who are involved in Maritime design. The naval industry (Ship Design, Naval Construction, Naval or Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture, etc) is currently very lucrative in Brazil. As is the whole area of petrochemical extraction and it’s related sub-industries.

Ever since the initial discovery of the oil resources off the coast off the continent, there has been immense anticipation of just how large exactly they were.  Of course, preliminary estimates were tentative. Then the more detailed studies began to sound fantastically optimistic. Such large numbers were suggested by experts, that many saw this as an opportunity for Brazil to leapfrog itself into a prime position in global oil production.

However, now that Petrobras (among others) has started to invest in the infrastructure for its future prospects, it certainly seems to be turning into reality.

Image via Wikipedia

The first 100% Brazilian oil platform...

For example; Petrobras is currently constructing 15 mobile oil processing ships for its current projects. This does not include what Petrobras will construct for its future prospects in the recently discovered oilfields in the Atlantic ocean to the east of Brazil. Such as in the Santos Basin, the Campos Basin (namely Peregrino), the Espirito-Santo Basin, the Jejuitinhonha & Camamu-Almada… all of which are off the coast of Rio de Janeiro.

Graphic representation of a processing vessel's role

So to put this into context, each one of these 15 ships is valued at $1.3 billion dollars!

Typical example of an extraction vessel for crude oil

Through my recent conversations with senior members of this industry, I have become aware of the growth in this sector. To the extent that being a senior designer in this area, can mean you are at will to name your price ( meaning a more than substantial income), such is the current demand for these skills.

So, if you are thinking of expanding your horizons, and would like to be part of a developing resource… then Brazil is the place for you to go.

Recently, there have been a few tell-tale signs that the Oil & Gas industry in Brazil, is not far from realising its potential.

Firstly,

Hermod completes Peregrino heavy lift.

Statoil has completed a heavy lift of two wellhead platforms on the Peregrino field offshore Brazil using the vessel Hermod. The development is the group’s largest offshore project outside the Norwegian continental shelf.

Hook-up and completion are under way. The company plans to begin 30 horizontal production and seven water injection wells later this year.

The field’s FPSO is scheduled to arrive for hook up and commissioning in the coming months. Maersk is constructing the vessel at the Keppel Shipyard in Singapore. The FPSO’s mooring systems are in place following an installation program by the offshore construction vessel Boa Deep earlier this year.

Peregrino is 85 km (53 mi) off the coast of Brazil in a water depth of up to 100 m (328 ft). First oil is anticipated in 2011 and will continue up to 2040, Statoil says.

Sevan Driller arrives in Brazil.

The Sevan Driller arrived in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Saturday, March 27, says Sevan Marine. The ultra deepwater drilling unit will undergo custom clearance and acceptance testing by Petrobras before beginning operations under a six-year contract.

Petrobras downgrades project portfolio for 2011-2014.

Petrobras has decreased its project portfolio investment for 2011-2014 from $148 billion to $139 billion.

The company’s board has approved $257 billion worth of projects for after 2014. According to the company, the investments aim to increase oil and natural gas production, taking advantage of success in the post- and pre-salt, and exploratory activities.

The E&P project portfolio includes construction of production platforms and drilling rigs, support vessels, and investments in transportation infrastructure.

Lanxess Completes “Sugar Cane” Power Plant In Brazil.

Image via Wikipedia

Ecologically grown sugarcane in Brazil for production of enthanol

Specialty chemicals group Lanxess has completed a cogeneration plant to produce steam and power from biobased sources at its iron oxide facility in Porto Feliz, Sao Paulo state, Brazil. The plant runs on sugarcane bagasse.

Ethanol produced from the sugar in sugarcane, is also very popular in Brazil as an alternative fuel for vehicles. Most “petrol stations” here stock it alongside the other common fuels. Being cheaper than petrol and diesel, it is of course popular. However it does not perform as well as the more traditional options. Roughly lasting 75% of the distance that diesel would get you.

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Brazil Backs $4-Billion Peruvian Hydropower Project

A Brazilian-backed proposal to build a 2,000-megawatt hydroelectric plant in the Peruvian Amazon has gained momentum in recent weeks as the government of the Andean nation has thrown its weight behind the effort.

Let’s hope that this project is handled as carefully as it should be. The Amazon Basin is a unique resource, and it has endured enough damage through man’s actions. I am assured that projects in this region are now strictly planned and maintained to preserve the environment of the Amazon. This may be true for the majority of the Basin, which is in Brazil, however I sincerely hope that Peru will take a similar attitude when embarking on this project.

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Brazil is the world’s tenth largest energy consumer with much of its energy coming from renewable sources, particularly hydroelectricity and ethanol; non-renewable energy is mainly produced from oil and natural gas. A global power in agriculture and natural resources, Brazil experienced tremendous economic growth over the past three decades. It is expected to become a major oil producer and exporter, having recently made huge oil discoveries.

More news coming soon, on these (soon to be operational) Oil fields.

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